earrings, follow her on Instagram use_the_force_young_beadawan 

earrings, follow her on Instagram use_the_force_young_beadawan 

earrings, Heidi BigKnife (Shawnee)
These grass earrings are made from biclad metal: a layer of gold bonded to a layer of silver. The earrings are folded to resemble a blade of grass.

earrings, Heidi BigKnife (Shawnee)

These grass earrings are made from biclad metal: a layer of gold bonded to a layer of silver. The earrings are folded to resemble a blade of grass.

Anonymous asked:

Is it more common to native women to go braless than in other women?

Even though I’m offended by this question, I’m going to humor you to dispel whatever “Native Americans are all hippies in touch with Nature////Native women are all hypersexual earth goddesses” myth you’re working from here:

The modern bra was invented in 1889, and wasn’t really popular until after WWI (corsets went out of fashion when metal became expensive due to the war). So obviously Native women pre-1889 were not wearing what we now think of as bras, because no one was. They didn’t exist. Prior to the invention of the modern bra, some Native women wore corsets, depending on their contact with settlers. Many girls in residential schools were forced to wear corsets, and taught that it was improper and distasteful to go out into the world without one. Many Native women that needed the approval of settlers for their political/personal agendas (policymaking, access to education, social status, etc) wore corsets because they had to to be considered respectable. And maybe some just liked how it looked. 

I would imagine that Native women have been wearing modern bras with as much frequency as any other race, because our fashion tastes change with the times, just like any other race. We also are not exempt from the colonial misogyny and sexism in the world that penalizes women who choose to not wear bras (it’s often still considered unprofessional, weird, gross, etc) or dress to Western standards of beauty. 

-A